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The Chinese Experience & Gung Hay Fat Choy


In China there are a variety of festivals throughout the year. Chinese New Year is perhaps the most important and the exact date varies from year to year following the lunar cycle. Years are divided into groups of 12 with each year being represented by a different animal: the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Sheep, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig.

Chinese New Year is celebrated in January or February depending on the moon and the festivities last several weeks. Other festivals celebrated include the Lantern Festival held on the 15th day of the first lunar month and this marks the last day of the New Year Festival which means it can be in March. The Zhonghe Festival or Blue Dragon Festival is normally held around March or April and the Ghost Festival in September or October again all dependent on the lunar calendar.

Our visually stunning Chinese workshops involve two 15 metre dragons and a beautiful southern lion costume plus a range of Chinese instruments including highly decorated drums, cymbals and gongs. This very special workshop for all ages is centred around the dragon and lion dances with musical accompaniment producing a stunning spectacle, immersing children in the colourful Chinese culture.

Workshops allow for a maximum group size of 60 children. Sessions last one hour per group and like most of our workshops can involve the whole school throughout the day and can culminate in a grand performance/procession to round off the day perfectly.



It was so enjoyable for them all, a really exciting and fun day that got the message across about Chinese culture - and the cymbals were especially popular!”

Testimonials

“ Thank you for a fantastic Chinese workshops! From all of year 5!”

SoundsChinese

Hear an extract of Wa-Ha-Ha, a traditional Chinese folk tune, played on the hulusi!

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